Everyday english in 50 days

Point of concern: Meeting relatives, whether close or distant, can be a huge source of annoyance if they are the type who would poke and prod and make incessant queries about your personal life “Beta, when will you get married?” “Did you find a good job?” “You looked better with long hair beta” and so on. Now the usual solution would be to avoid such, but it is simply not possible at weddings, where you have to necessarily meet every uncle and aunt. Though their questions can leave you irritated to no extent, and you get this overwhelming desire to smack them in their faces, the niceties have to be maintained for the sake of family ties. So here is how you can deal in such situations (we are considering an aunt as an example)

You: Namaste aunty! Hope you are doing well.

Aunty: I am doing good, beta. Tell me about you. Mom and dad are well?

You:  Yes, aunty. They are all great. How are Rohan and Shruti?

Aunty: They are also good. You tell me about yourself. You have become quite thin (she can also say that you have put on some weight, the annoying questions will probably begin here). Have you stopped eating?

You:  Aunty, job is quite hectic these days. A critical project of a major U.S. /U.K. client has come up and I am quite busy in that (make sure you mention a big MNC to establish your importance work-wise). I hardly get the time to breathe, let alone eat.

Note: If currently you don’t have a job then you should say that you are looking for a good growth-oriented job and already have offers from several companies.

Aunty: Oh! Rohan is also working in a U.S.-based multinational… (aunties and uncles never let go of a chance to boast about their own kids) anyway, what about your wedding? Isn’t it high time?

You: Haha, looking for a good and compatible match. I have met several but didn’t feel a connection. What about Rohan? Is he married? Tell me about it! (the key here is not to get annoyed but deftly turn the question towards the family of the aunty)

Aunty: Oh many matches are coming in, some of them from abroad also, but I am not happy with the girls. They are too modern and have too much attitude.

You: Heh aunty, you want a traditional, sanskaari girl (let out a chuckle). You won’t find many among the educated ones.

Aunty: Hmmm, kids these don’t have much respect for Indian values and culture. That’s why our country is so backward.

Note: By this point, depending on whether you love political and cultural arguments, you can engage in a discussion on the same or safely make an exit. You have already steered away the discussion from yourself successfully.

You: I agree. Anyway, aunty, it was nice catching up with you. Give my respect to uncle and everyone else. Tell Rohan and Shruti that I will stay in touch! Goodbye!

Aunty: Okay beta! God bless you.

Remember: You can always make an excuse by using your mobile and an imaginary phone call, but it is better to deal with it in the shortest manner possible!

Keen to read about more conversations? Here are some helpful ones that you should definitely check.

 

 

 

 

 

Everyday english in 50 days
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